Nichrome wire heat up

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Joined: Mar 11, 2020

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Nichrome wire heat up
March 11, 2020 - 5:23am

I'm working on a project that heats 2 pieces of nichrome wire. They are complete circuit loops. I've run both loops by themselves and works fine. When I combine them to make 1 line (parrellel), it pops the fuse. Is their any reason nichrome can't be heated in a parrellel circuit ??? I look forward to your council. Thanks in advance

chris

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Which power supply you are giving
March 13, 2020 - 11:13pm

Please specify the power supply you are giving to the coils.Is that giving sufficient current to drive both the parallel coils?

Chris's picture

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The first wise person to ask me that
March 15, 2020 - 3:33pm

So I went and bought a couple of toasters and clipped the cords. They are polarized plugs. And I had an old heater here. I also clipped that cord to use. 
since writing this I've learned a little more. Both circuit tests I did were with the heater cord. I believe that's 14 gauge. And the toaster plugs are 16 gauge. Not positive on either. I believe I used the heater cord to combine the 2 circuits, because it's longer. The gauge of the nichrome is 20. But I think I will drop that down to 26 or 32 if I can 

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When heated in air, most
April 19, 2020 - 2:04pm

When heated in air, most metals then oxidize quickly, become brittle and break. Nichrome wire, when heated to red-hot temperatures, develops an outer layer of chromium oxide, which is thermodynamically stable in air, is mostly impervious to oxygen, and protects the heating element from further oxidation.
Almost any conductive wire can be used for heating, but most metals conduct electricity with great efficiency, requiring them to be formed into very thin and delicate wires to create enough resistance to generate heat. When heated in air, most metals then oxidize quickly, become brittle and break. Nichrome wire, when heated to red-hot temperatures, develops an outer layer of chromium oxide,